Undergraduate Student Academic Resources

 

 

 


Academic Advising

Current and prospective mathematics majors and minors are invited to schedule a meeting with the advisor by sending an email to [email protected] or directly to the advisor; please include a list of the times that you are available. Students are also welcome to visit during office hours, although setting up a separate time is better.
 

 


How to Declare a Major or Minor

  1. Schedule a meeting with a Mathematics Department advisor by sending an email to [email protected]. If you wish to speak with one advisor in particular, you can contact them directly to request a meeting. Please include a list of times when you are free to meet. While it is preferable to make an appointment so the advisor will be free of other obligations, you are welcome to just drop by during office hours.
  2. Bring a copy of the Declaration of Major/Minor Form for your home school (e.g., CCAS, SEAS, etc.) to your meeting for the advisor’s signature. CCAS students can use the Declaration of Major/Minor Form from the CCAS Undergraduate Advising Office.
  3. Once the advisor has signed off, follow the directions on the form for submitting the form through your school’s undergraduate advising office.
     


 


Transfer Credit

Are you trying to get transfer credit? To apply for transfer credit:

  1. Complete the transfer credit form for your school. Columbian College students can find the form on the Undergraduate Advising site.
  2. Go online or get a book from the school you want the transfer from and make a copy of the course description. A syllabus from the specific instructor teaching the course works as well.
  3. Combine the petition form and course description and email or bring them to the Mathematics Department office
  4. A committee will look at your request. You should receive an email response within a week.

 

 


Honors

Students interested in earning special honors in mathematics must: 

  • Meet GW’s general special honors requirements.
  • Graduate with a GPA of 3.5 in mathematics major classes.
  • Complete the three-credit MATH 4995 course, usually in the senior year, along with the accompanying research project.
  • Write a senior thesis paper and complete an oral defense.

Zachary Peterson, 2018

Hurwitz Transitivity of Factorizations of Coxeter Elements of G4 

Shigeng Sun, 2017

Numerical Study of Periodic Migration in a Physical Model of One Dimentional Cell on Micro-pattern
Modeling the International Links Between Interbank Offered Rates Among Different Markets Through A Wavelet Analysis Approach

Mariel Supina, 2016

Grover's Search Algorithm: Quantum Speed-UP

Jacob Learned, 2016

Quantum Neural Networks

Thomas Riggs, 2016

Counting Cycles in Directed Graphs

Jacob Maibach, 2016

Uniform Matroids, Transversal Extensions, and Set System Mobility

Changkai Sun, 2015

Blow up and scattering thresholds for the focusing nonlinear Schroedinger equation

Jiayuan Wang, 2014

A computational method for solving exponential-polynomial Diophantine equations

Milica Taskovic, 2014

Axiom of Choice across Mathematical Disciplines
This project was supported by CCAS Luther Rice Undergraduate Research Fellowship.

James Clark, 2014

Complexity of Orders on Computable Groups
This project was presented at GW research Day on April1, 2014.

Andrew Hirsch, 2013

Turing Categories
This project was presented at GW Research Day on April 2, 2013.

Caprice Rayn Stanley, 2013,

Chromatic Symmetric Functions and Graph Gluing

William C. Smith, 2012,

Categorical semantics of quantum protocols
This research project is supported by GW George Gamow Undergraduate Research Fellowship

Katie Walsh, 2008,

Minesweeper matrices, rectangular diagrams, and the Alexander polynomia.

Larisa Perolli, 2006

The Unimodality and Log-Concavity of the Independence Numbers of Certain Lattice Path Matroids.
This work appeared in: Sarah Baker and Larisa Perolli, Unimodality and Log-Concavity of the Independence and Whitney Numbers of Certain Lattice Path Matroids, Pi Mu Epsilon Journal, 12:6, Spring 2007, 325-334, and won the 2007 Richard V. Andree Award for the best student-written paper.

Sarah Baker, 2006

The Unimodality and Log-Concavity of the Whitney Numbers of Certain Lattice Path Matroids.
This work appeared in: Sarah Baker and Larisa Perolli, Unimodality and Log-Concavity of the Independence and Whitney Numbers of Certain Lattice Path Matroids, Pi Mu Epsilon Journal, 12:6, Spring 2007, 325-334, and won the 2007 Richard V. Andree Award for the best student-written paper.

David Penneys, 2005,

A Survey of Hyperbolic Groups Acting on their Gromov Boundaries.

Amy L. Nagahashi, 2001,

Billiard Links in the 3-Ball.

Nirit Sandman, 2000,

An Exploration of a Type-B Tamari Poset. This work appeared in: 
Nirit Sandman, A type-B Tamari poset, Discrete Applied Mathematics 143 (2004) 110–122.

 

The D.C. Gamma Chapter of Pi Mu Epsilon is the George Washington University chapter of Pi Mu Epsilon, Inc. The chapter was first established in 1966. The group is open, by invitation, to accomplished mathematics majors.

 


Course Rotation Plan

View the Course Rotation Plan (PDF) to see course offerings in Mathematics for the next several years. The internal planning document is used to help with the department’s long-term scheduling, but students may view it as they plan their courses of study.

 


More Academic Resources

Academic Commons
Book peer tutoring or review sessions, research and writing help, step-by-step study strategies, language support and more.

GW Libraries
Explore on-campus libraries and online research databases. 

Language Center
Sign up for English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses, practice with language meet-up groups, take a language exam or talk to someone about waiving language requirements.

CCAS Undergraduate Advising
Get assistance from your Columbian College academic advisor to navigate declaring a major or minor, transferring credits and other academic support.

Writing Center
Make a free appointment to work with a writing consultant on your next project, from the brainstorming phase through drafting and revising.